Japan culture essay

This article was originally written for Japan Society's previous site for educators, "Journey through Japan," in Change was the currency of the Meiji era —

Japan culture essay

When its compared to the United States, there are certainly a lot of similarities to found, but Japan and the U. While a group of people cannot be generalized as a whole, and, just like America, culture can vary from region to region, here are twelve cultural differences that stick out to American expatriates living in Japan.

Religious Practices Differ The vast majority of Japanese people identify as Shintoist, Buddhist, or Japan culture essay at the same time. Though Christian missionaries have been present in Japan for hundreds of years, their presence has had little effect on Japan's religious identity and philosophy.

Therefore, issues that are the basis of debates in the Abrahamic faiths, such as gay marriage or teaching creationism in schools, lack a religious foundation in Japan.

In Japan, Shinto and Buddhist practices are predominantly limited to traditions, celebrations, and superstitions more than strong spiritual belief. For example, in America, a politician's religious affiliation may become the cause of heavy debate, but there are few such issues in Japan.

People tend to stand a relatively far distance apart when speaking, and last names with honorifics are used. An example of this can be seen in different approaches to customer service. In America, ideal customer service is usually warm and friendly.

In Japan, it is formal and unobtrusive. Waiters don't usually stop by tables to ask customers how the food is and what their weekend plans are, and strangers won't often chat while waiting for the bus.

Physically touching is also more sparse in Japan than it is in America.

Japan culture essay

Politicians are quick to resign after making mistakes, which is why Japan has switched its prime ministers almost once a year since Japan has a parliament system with many parties, and politicians don't win elections with a majority vote.

In fact, Japanese people have a notoriously low voter turnout rate. On the other hand, Japanese people tend to have a lot of love for their country, and they celebrate their unique history, language, and culture in a way that's not dissimilar to Americans.

Because most Japanese citizens have an identical ethnic and national identity, seeing people who don't appear to be of East Asian descent can lead to instant assumptions of being a foreigner.

This can affect society in the sense that because Japanese people view their culture as homogeneous, it is expected that everyone understands the traditions and rules of society. Japanese People Bow It is well known that many Asian countries utilize bowing instead of shaking hands, but Japanese people bow in more situations than just greetings.

Bowing can be done while apologizing or expressing gratitude. In business or professional environments people might bow deeply to a 45 degree angle, but most bows are a casual bob of the head and slight incline of the back.

Despite the prevalent importance of bowing in Japan, Japanese people are well aware of the fact that foreigners usually shake hands and might readily offer their hands in greeting instead.An essay has been defined in a variety of ways.

One definition is a "prose composition with a focused subject of discussion" or a "long, systematic discourse". It . Food Culture in Japan (Food Culture around the World) [Michael Ashkenazi, Jeanne Jacob] on grupobittia.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Americans are familiarizing themselves with Japanese food, thanks especially sushi's wild popularity and ready availability. This timely book satisfies the new interest and taste for Japanese food. Acculturation is the process of social, psychological, and cultural change that stems from blending between cultures.

The effects of acculturation can be seen at multiple levels in both the original (native) and newly adopted (host) cultures. Historically speaking, acculturation is a direct change of one's culture through dominance over another's culture through either military or political.

One of the biggest culture shock moments for me in Japan was in a grocery store. I didn’t know it at the time. In the moment, I just thought the entire nation of Japan had been designed to make me angry.

In this essay, historian James Huffman outlines the history of the critical transition Japan underwent between and , as well as providing some background about the events leading up to this period of rapid societal change.

- Japanese culture The small island country of Japan is rich in a culture that has developed over thousands of years. It is very difficult to analyze another culture .

Cultural Differences Between the USA and Japan | Owlcation